Rocket Fuel
Ultimate 48 Sweepstakes
Please provide a valid email address.
Close

Blog - GAMBLING

The job of a Thoroughbred trainer is multifaceted. They must keep their horses happy and healthy, learn their quirks, help them reach their potential, and place them in spots where they can win.

One of the trainer’s toughest jobs is keeping racehorse owners happy. Owners get anxious and they want to see their horses run. With many owners, patience is not a strong suit.

Communication between a trainer and owner can be paramount. Good trainers are honest with owners about the quality and health of their stock, which determines the best course of action.

Trainers also have to fortify relationships with jockeys and jockey agents as well as racetrack officials.

Needless to say, a trainer better have an advantageous cell phone package.

To be a successful handicapper, often times you have to also be a mind reader. Understanding the methods and intentions of a trainer can help one develop an accurate assessment the racehorse and their potential for success on the day.

10. Horseman

Every horse is an individual, physically and mentally.

A trainer should be a horseman first. The best trainers understand their horses and their quirks. They have a handle on what they need and when they need it. They put a proper training schedule in place and change equipment when necessary.

Trainers are up at the crack of dawn and they work seven days a week, 365 days a year. Proper vacations are few and far between, but they love their horses and hope springs eternal.

TRAINERS SHOULD BE HORSEMEN

Trainer3

Photo by Eclipse Sportswire

9. Game manager

A condition book is a trainer’s guide to what races a track will offer. Trainers have the opportunity to look weeks into the future, and have several categories and distances to choose from. It is up to the trainer to figure out where his/her horses fit best.

If a younger, developing horse can’t handle competition at high levels, the trainer has some decisions to make. They can try a different distance or surface (turf), make an equipment change or drop the horse in for a claiming tag.

Oftentimes class drops can be looked at negatively, but with high-percentage trainers, winning is the main objective. They are spotting their horses where they can succeed because their owners LOVE winner’s circle pictures. 

8. Strategy and intention

The trainers that win at the highest percentages are those who know their horses best. They are not overly ambitious with the placement of their stock, and they have a game plan with every individual in the barn. 

There’s always a purpose for a trainer to enter a horse in a race. They all like to win as often as possible, but knowing how to read a trainer’s intentions is an important handicapping skill. Good trainers have a plan and many times one race will be used to set a horse up for a more suitable spot down the road.

Is the horse ready first out of the box or off layoff, or do they need a race or two?

Trainer profiling and workout patterns can help us decide.

What was the horse born to do? Based on pedigree and body type, is the horse in the right spot, or is today’s race being used as a springboard to something else?

When a horse ships for a stakes race, the trainer’s intent is unquestioned. They are there to win. Handicap for class and pace, and watch replays of recent races to get an even better feel for current form.  

Is the horse staying at the same class level, or are they on the rise, or dropping, and why?

Is the horse better than ever, or in need of a confidence boost?

Is the trainer following a plan with this particular horse, or is it go time?

In a short field, if you see that a trainer has an uncoupled entry in the race, pay particular attention to those horses. In all probability, the trainer entered a second horse in the race to make sure that it was carded.

If a horse appears to be in over his head, but is trained by a respected conditioner, give him/her consideration in your gimmicks. The horse may be coming around, and the trainer may be taking a shot at a big pot.

TRAINERS HAVE DIFFERENT REASONS FOR RUNNING A HORSE

Trainer2

Photo by Eclipse Sportswire

7. Stats can tell the story

When you handicap a horse, you’re also handicapping the trainer.

Check the categorical statistics on the trainer that apply to the race at hand.

Numbers don’t lie.

Daily Racing Form provides wonderful statistics in all applicable categories.

How good is a trainer off a 180-day layoff?

How often do they win when cutting a horse back from a route to a sprint?

The stats provide a win percentage and an ROI (return on investment).

From a horseplayer’s perspective, a high percentage of winners is great, but a positive return on investment is where the profits lie.

6. Hot and cold streaks

Certain trainers point for certain meets. They also tend to fire live bullets in bunches. Ride the wave when they are hot, and step off the gas pedal when they’re not.

5. Toteboard

It’s no secret, trainers bet, some more than others.

Watch the toteboard for clues. A barn’s true intention is often reflected in odds. Early money is often smart money and lack of it for a paper contender could be a negative warning sign.

Analyzing past performances gives you an idea of what the horse is capable of, but only the stable knows how well a horse is “doing” physically and mentally and in their training.

4. Claiming game 

How well does the trainer play the claiming game?

Do they claim often or infrequently?

Do they win off the claim, and are they known for improving on their purchases?

Does the trainer drop to win or entice others to claim their horses away?

Some claiming trainers move their horses around like chess pieces, from circuit to circuit, looking for just the right spot.

Late in many meets or seasons when trainers are changing venues or simply regrouping, they will drop their horses in class, hoping to not only get a win but potentially to get the horse claimed.

DOES THE TRAINER PLAY THE CLAIM GAME?

Trainer

Photo by Eclipse Sportswire

3. Size of operation

Training racehorses is a numbers game.

Some trainers are in charge of dozens of horses, while others just have a handful under their care.

Remember, although they’re not on hand personally most mornings, many of the “super trainers” have horses stabled at multiple tracks with assistants on hand to handle the day-to-day operation. They strategize which tracks to send each horse to, based on surface (dirt versus synthetic) and perceived level of competition. 

When returning from a layoff, smaller outfits tend to have their horses ready to put their best hoof forward right out of the box. As a whole, they don’t have many opportunities to run, so they want to try to make them count.

2. Jockeying for position

Some trainers have a “first-call” rider, while others use multiple jockeys, depending on the best fit.

Pay extra attention when trainers use their “go-to” riders or when an under-the-radar conditioner lures a top jockey to the saddle of one of their horses.

1. Dressed for the occasion?

If you see a trainer who usually passes on a shave, and dresses in a Hawaiian shirt, shorts and sandals on a typical race day transformed to suit and tie and clean shaven, you might want to give their horse extra consideration.

The horse is the athlete but the trainer is the coach, and ultimately success will be determined by their strategy and management.

Remember, with knowledge comes horsepower!

red white blue Bar

(también en Español)

Es Hora de Partida con Joe Kristufek: El Entrenador

El trabajo de un entrenador de Purasangres es multifacético. Ellos deben mantener a sus caballos felices y saludables, aprender sus peculiaridades, ayudarlos a alcanzar su potencial, y ubicarlos en los lugares donde puedan ganar.

Uno de los más difíciles trabajos de los entrenadores es mantener contentos  a los dueños de los caballos. Los propietarios se vuelven ansiosos y quieren ver correr a sus caballos. Con tantos propietarios, la paciencia no es un punto fuerte.

La comunicación entre un entrenador y un propietario puede ser lo más importante. Los buenos entrenadores son honestos con los dueños acerca de la calidad y la salud de sus adquisiciones, lo que determina el mejor rumbo de la acción.

Los entrenadores también tienen que fortalecer las relaciones con los jinetes y sus agentes, así como con las autoridades del hipódromo.

Y no necesitamos decirlo, pero es mejor que un entrenador tenga un ventajoso paquete de llamadas para su teléfono móvil.

Para ser un pronosticador exitoso, a menudo también tienes que ser un lector de mentes. Comprender los métodos y las intenciones de un entrenador puede ayudarnos a desarrollar una evaluación precisa del caballo de carrera y del potencial éxito que pueda tener en el día.

10. Hípico

Cada caballo es un individuo, física y mentalmente.

Un entrenador debe ser ante todo, un hípico. Los mejores entrenadores entienden a sus caballos y sus peculiaridades. Ellos tienen una idea de lo que necesitan y cuándo lo necesitan. Ellos ponen en marcha una apropiada agenda de entrenamiento y cambian los aperos cuando es necesario.

Los entrenadores se levantan cuando raya el alba y trabajan siete días a la semana, 365 días al año. Las vacaciones personales son muy pocas y distantes entre sí, pero ellos aman sus caballos y su esperanza es eterna

LOS ENTRENADORES DEBEN SER HÍPICOS

Trainer3

Foto por Eclipse Sportswire

9. Administrando el Juego

Un programa de entradas es la guía de un entrenador para saber qué tipo de carreras ofrecerá el hipódromo. Los entrenadores tienen la oportunidad de mirar semanas hacia adelante, y tener varias categorías y distancias para escoger. Depende del entrenador descubrir dónde su caballo correrá mejor.

Si es un caballo joven o aún en desarrollo, que no puede competir en niveles de categoría, el entrenador tiene algunas decisiones que tomar. Puede tratar diferentes distancias o superficies (césped), hacer un cambio en los aperos o bajarlo de categoría para una carrera de reclamo.

Muchas veces hacerlo correr en un lote más suave puede ser visto como algo negativo, pero para los entrenadores de alto porcentaje de triunfos, ganar es el principal objetivo. Ellos siempre están colocando a sus caballos donde pueden tener éxito, porque a sus dueños les ENCANTA tomarse las fotos en  el círculo de ganadores.

8. Estrategia e Intención

Los entrenadores que ganan con los más altos porcentajes son aquellos que mejor conocen a sus caballos. No son demasiado ambiciosos con el sitio donde corren a su caballada y tienen un plan de acción con cada individuo en su establo. 

Para un entrenador siempre hay un propósito a la hora en que inscribe a su caballo en una carrera. A todos ellos les gusta ganar tanto como sea posible, pero saber cómo leer las intenciones de un entrenador es una importante herramienta para elegir un ganador. Los buenos entrenadores tienen un plan y muchas veces una carrera será usada para dejar listo al caballo en camino a un evento posterior más apropiado.

¿Está el caballo listo para ganar en su primera carrera o viniendo del descanso, o ellos necesitan una carrera o dos?

El perfil del entrenador y sus patrones de trabajo nos pueden ayudar a decidir.

¿Para qué fue criado el caballo? ¿Basados en el pedigrí o en su biotipo corporal, está el caballo en la carrera indicada, o la carrera de hoy está siendo usada como trampolín para algo más?

Cuando un caballo viaja para correr en un clásico, la intención del entrenador es incuestionable. Ellos están allí para ganar. Analicen la categoría del lote, el desarrollo de carrera, y observen los videos de actuaciones recientes para tener una idea, incluso mejor, de su actual estado físico.  

¿Permanece el caballo en su mismo nivel de categoría, o están subiendo o bajando de ella, y por qué?

¿Está el caballo mejor que nunca, o necesita una dosis de confianza?

¿Está el entrenador siguiendo un plan con este caballo en particular, o está yendo con todo esta vez?

En un lote reducido, si ves que un entrenador tiene inscrito a más de un caballo en la carrera, presta especial atención a ellos. En todos los casos, el entrenador inscribió a un segundo caballo para asegurarse que la prueba se programara.

Si un caballo parece estar en un lote exigente, pero es entrenado por un respetado profesional, considéralo debidamente en tus exóticas. El caballo puede estar superándose, y el entrenador está jugándosela por un dividendo jugoso.

LOS ENTRENADORES TIENEN DIFERENTES RAZONES PARA CORRER UN CABALLO

Trainer2

Foto de Eclipse Sportswire

7. Las Estadísticas pueden contar la historia

Cuando analizas a un caballo, también estás analizando al entrenador.

Chequea las estadísticas del entrenador en la categoría que aplica a la carrera que analizas.

Los números no mienten.

Daily Racing Form provee formidables estadísticas en todas las categorías aplicables.

¿Cuán bueno es un entrenador luego de un descanso de 180-días?

¿Cuán a menudo ellos ganan cuando recortan en distancia a un caballo, desde carreras de ruta a carreras de velocidad?

Las estadísticas proveen un porcentaje de triunfos y un ROI (retorno sobre la inversión).

Desde la perspectiva de un apostador, un elevado porcentaje de ganadores es grandioso, pero un retorno positivo en la inversión es donde descansa la ganancia.

6. Rachas frías y calientes

Determinados entrenadores apuntan para determinados mítines. Tienden a disparar sus balas en ráfagas. Súbete a la ola cuando ellos estén calientes, y quita el pie del acelerador cuando no lo estén.

5. Totalizador

No es un secreto, los entrenadores apuestan, algunos más que otros.

Observa el totalizador para ver los datos. La verdadera intención de la caballeriza está a menudo reflejada en los dividendos. Las jugadas iniciales son frecuentemente jugadas inteligentes y darles a ellas poca importancia puede significar el descuido de una importante señal.

Analizar las últimas actuaciones puede darte una idea de la capacidad corredora del caballo, pero sólo en el establo se sabe cuán bien un caballo está “haciéndolo” física y mentalmente en su entrenamiento.

4. El juego del “reclamo” 

¿Cuán bien juega el entrenador el juego del “reclamo”?

¿”Reclama” a menudo o poco frecuentemente?

¿Ganan a la primera, con los caballos que “reclaman”, y son conocidos por mejorar a los caballos que adquieren?

¿Los baja de categoría para ganar o atrae a otros para que se lleven sus caballos?

Algunos entrenadores de “reclamo” mueven a sus caballos como si fuesen piezas de ajedrez, de circuito en circuito, en busca del sitio apropiado.

Al final de muchos mítines o temporadas, cuando los entrenadores están cambiando de instalaciones o simplemente reagrupándose, ellos suelen bajar de categoría a sus caballos, no sólo esperando ganar sino que potencialmente alguien los reclame.

¿JUEGAN LOS ENTRENADORES EL JUEGO DEL “RECLAMO”?

Trainer

Foto de Eclipse Sportswire

3. El tamaño de la operación

Entrenar caballos de carrera es un asunto de números.

Algunos entrenadores tienen a su cargo docenas de caballos, mientras que otros solamente tienen un puñado a su cuidado.

Recuerden, aunque ellos no estén en persona la mayoría de las mañanas, muchos de los “súper entrenadores” tienen caballos establecidos en múltiples hipódromos con asistentes para manejar las operaciones del día a día. Ellos trazan la estrategia debida para escoger a cuál hipódromo enviar sus caballos, basándose en el tipo de pista (arena versus sintética) y el nivel de competencia que perciben. 

Cuando hacen reaparecer un caballo, los profesionales más chicos tienden a tener sus pupilos listos y a punto desde la primera de vueltas. Como un todo, ellos no tienen muchas oportunidades de correr, así que tratarán de que esa carrera cuente.

2. Utilizando a los jinetes

Algunos entrenadores tienen un jinete “preferencial”, mientras que otros utilizan múltiples látigos, dependiendo de la mejor forma de sus pupilos.

Pongan especial atención cuando los entrenadores usan a sus jinetes “preferenciales” o cuando un entrenador bajo-el-radar seduce a un jinete de primera fila para conducir uno de sus caballos.

1. ¿Vestido para la ocasión?

Si ves a un entrenador que normalmente tiene la barba sin afeitar, viste con camisa hawaiana, pantaloncitos cortos y sandalias, en un día típico de carreras, y se transforma vistiendo terno, corbata y afeitada al ras, deberías dar a su caballo una consideración adicional.

El caballo es el atleta pero el entrenador es quien lo dirige, y el éxito final será determinado por su estrategia y por su manejo.

¡Recuerden, con el conocimiento vienen los caballos de fuerza!


Image Description

Joe Kristufek

The face of ABR's "Racing 101", Joe Kristufek is a self-proclaimed horse racing "ambassador," and fan development has been his passion since the moment he took his first job in the industry.

Kristufek is the morning-line maker for Arlington Park and Kentucky Downs and he serves as the handicapper and racing writer for the Daily Herald newspaper. 

Kristufek has developed and executed several horse racing-related, fan-education projects both online and onsite and he is a member of the National Turf Writers and Broadcasters. 

He has co-owned five horses in partnership and is the process of developing an ownership group of his own. Kristufek is also becoming an increasing presence on the tournament scene. 

Kristufek was the on-air talent for Hawthorne's between-race presentation and replay shows in the 1990s, and served as a on-air host and content coordinator for The Racing Network in 2000-2001. He was the owner, producer and host of popular horse racing magazine show Horsin' Around TV, airing 85 episodes from 2003-2005 on Fox Sports Chicago and Comcast SportsNet Chicago.

A beer and indie/alternative music snob, Joe is a Chicago Bulls season ticket holder and there aren't too many people who can keep up with him on a billards table. 

 

Image Description

Joe Kristufek

The face of ABR's "Racing 101", Joe Kristufek is a self-proclaimed horse racing "ambassador," and fan development has been his passion since the moment he took his first job in the industry.

Kristufek is the morning-line maker for Arlington Park and Kentucky Downs and he serves as the handicapper and racing writer for the Daily Herald newspaper. 

Kristufek has developed and executed several horse racing-related, fan-education projects both online and onsite and he is a member of the National Turf Writers and Broadcasters. 

He has co-owned five horses in partnership and is the process of developing an ownership group of his own. Kristufek is also becoming an increasing presence on the tournament scene. 

Kristufek was the on-air talent for Hawthorne's between-race presentation and replay shows in the 1990s, and served as a on-air host and content coordinator for The Racing Network in 2000-2001. He was the owner, producer and host of popular horse racing magazine show Horsin' Around TV, airing 85 episodes from 2003-2005 on Fox Sports Chicago and Comcast SportsNet Chicago.

A beer and indie/alternative music snob, Joe is a Chicago Bulls season ticket holder and there aren't too many people who can keep up with him on a billards table. 

 

blog comments powered by Disqus

Sponsors & Partners

  • FoxSports1
  • NBC Sports
  • Logo 6
  • Saratoga
  • Santa Anita
  • CBS Sports
  • Monmouth
  • Keeneland
  • Gulfstream Park
  • Del Mar
  • Belmont Park
  • Arlington Park
  • OwnerView